India, Media, Newspapers, Politics

25 world newspaper front pages with Narendra Modi and BJP’s victory headlines

The elections in the world’s largest democracy (that is also a prominent emerging economy) is obviously an item of importance in the world media. Here’s a snapshot of how newspapers around the world covered the news of Narendra Modi and BJP’s emphatic victory in the elections to the 16th Lok Sabha.

Modi might have won these elections promising development and making a deliberate shift away from BJP’s Hindutva politics, but he is still identified as a Hindu nationalist in many of the headlines and news reports.

New York Times, New York, USA

New York Times, New York, USA

Wall Street Journal, New York, USA

Wall Street Journal, New York, USA

Dawn, Karachi, Pakistan

Dawn, Karachi, Pakistan

The Independent, Dhaa, Bangladesh

The Independent, Dhaa, Bangladesh

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Frankfurt, Germany

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Frankfurt, Germany

Lidove Noviny, Prague, Czech Republic

Lidove Noviny, Prague, Czech Republic

de Volkskrant, Amsterdam, Netherlands

de Volkskrant, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Buenos Aires Herald, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Buenos Aires Herald, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The Daily Star, Beirut, Lebanon

The Daily Star, Beirut, Lebanon

Gazeta do Povo, Curitiba, Brazil

Gazeta do Povo, Curitiba, Brazil

Khaleej Times, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Khaleej Times, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

El Mercurio, Santiago, Chile

El Mercurio, Santiago, Chile

Arab News, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Arab News, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Arab Times, Shuwaikh, Kuwait

Arab Times, Shuwaikh, Kuwait

Borneo Bulletin, Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam

Borneo Bulletin, Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam

Gulf News, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Gulf News, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Kuwait Times, Kuwait

Kuwait Times, Kuwait

La Stampa, Torino, Italy

La Stampa, Torino, Italy

Le Matinal, Port Louis, Mauritius

Le Matinal, Port Louis, Mauritius

Star, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Star, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The Australian Financial Review, Sydney, Australia

The Australian Financial Review, Sydney, Australia

The Himalayan Times, Kathmandu, Nepal

The Himalayan Times, Kathmandu, Nepal

The National, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

The National, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

The Straits Times, Singapore

The Straits Times, Singapore

Virgin Islands Daily News, Charlotte Amalie, Virgin Islands

Virgin Islands Daily News, Charlotte Amalie, Virgin Islands

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Why what's trending on Twitter in India is largely inconsequential
Internet, Media

Why what’s trending on Twitter in India is largely inconsequential

Now that the mainstream Indian media has discovered the wonders of the Internet, anything that is remotely out of the ordinary online tends to make headlines and triggers studio discussions.

One of the most misused words in the mainstream media is of course – hacking. And the other most followed and reported on is Twitter trends. While there is nothing wrong about reporting what is happening somewhere, but the importance given to many of the events are more often than not grossly out of proportion.

One such event is today’s top trend on Twitter – #PappuDiwas (because it happens to be Rahul Gandhi’s birthday).

Why what's trending on Twitter in India is largely inconsequential

To someone reading such a news item or watching it on the idiot box, it might give the impression that millions are logging in to express their vociferous opinion in 140 characters around the hashtag in question. But when you look at the actual numbers, they are too miniscule to be actually given that degree of importance.

For example, according to to Topsy (the service that returned me the highest figures for my search) there have been only 4796 tweets at the time of posting this and individual Twitter accounts would have tweeted multiple times with the same hashtag. This makes the number of actual people tweeting with the hashtag much smaller. Sometimes the top trends account for far fewer tweets.

Now how much would you weigh the opinion of, at most, a couple of thousand people (most of whom would also be from a similar socio-economic class) in an electorate of over 700 million?

I know that many would construe this as a pro-Congress post. But those who know, will know that this isn’t. The example used is only illustrative to drive the point that the universe of social media opinion in India is still in its formative stages to have any noticeable impact on actual politics, irrespective of what some studies say. More so for Twitter.

Also we should also not forget that Twitter, like so many other places, is full of opinionated idiots and they make the most merry out of the inane. #PappuDiwas, or for that matter #feku is no different.

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Twitter bird fight
Internet, Media, People

When @MasalaBai got @PoojaB1972’s goat

Twitter bird fight

Work for me is fun, more so with colleagues like @MasalaBai (Rituparna Chatterjee) around. So today following the news of the blast in an Israeli embassy car in Delhi when actress-turned-producer-turned-director Pooja Bhatt went on a rant against the media on Twitter, @MasalaBai couldn’t restrain the journalist within her. What followed was a tweet skirmish – @MasalaBai versus @PoojaB1972.

Good going girls.

Seems @MasalaBai had the last tweet.

Oh wait! It’s not over yet. Bhatt has some more ammunition left in her armoury and so does Chatterjee.

All that LOLing by @PoojaB1972 reminds me of Dimple Chaddha (Parineeti Chopra) from Ladies vs Ricky Bahl.

PS: I don’t follow @PoojaB1972

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